Aerospace Industries Association supports remote ID for hobby, heavy drones

Aerospace Industries Association supports remote ID for hobby, heavy drones

The Aviation Rule Committee (ARC) on UAS Identification and Tracking (UAS ID) was formed in June 2017 after plans to issue rules allowing drone flights over people were frozen, suddenly, early that year.

The regulatory plan had stalled after both law enforcement and homeland security agencies expressed concerns about allowing such flights because they had no way to identify bad actors.

It’s easy to enforce limitations when no one is permitted to make such flights. When flights over people become common place, how do you sort out who is flying illegally and may be dangerous?

“While the majority of UAS will be operated in compliance with operational regulations,” according to ARC report, “non-compliant or unauthorized UAS operations must be adequately addressed to ensure the safety and security of the NAS, critical infrastructure, and people on the ground.”

Industry was fuming. Flights over people, and the ability to do missions beyond the visual line of sight of the pilot (BVLOS) are widely regarded by commercial operators as essential if their operations are to make business sense. Further delay on a fix was painful.

Being able to identify a remote pilot “is the central concern,” the ARC wrote. However, despite the pressure for a solution, the authors noted in polite prose that, “the ARC did not reach consensus on an applicability threshold for ID and tracking requirements.” Read more

Source: insideunmannedsystems.com

Image: pixabay.com