UK ‘should be leading’ on integrating new drone technologies

drone technologies

UK ‘should be leading’ on integrating new drone technologies. The issues of UAVs and airspace management were debated at Cranfield University’s Technology Conference Visions of an Autonomous Future on 16 September 2016 part of its celebrations of 70 years since the foundation of the College of Aeronautics.

Our air traffic control systems run on the basis of principles which are now 60 years old. It’s no surprise then that the appearance of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) in our air space is seen as a serious and unmanageable threat to safety. UAVs straying into fligh tpaths are reported as major incidents, Japanese airports have started to use anti-UAV nets, a US technology firm is selling a ‘drone death-ray’. Continue reading “UK ‘should be leading’ on integrating new drone technologies”

Current drone traffic control system cannot scale to manage the volume of forecasted traffic

unmanned aircraft

There are dozens of videos on the Internet showing small, unmanned aircraft delivering medicine, packages, pizzas and tacos.

If you believe the hype, the skies may soon be crowded with these vehicles.

Last week, the Federal Aviation Administration took a big step toward defining this future by enacting the rules and regulations known as Part 107. Continue reading “Current drone traffic control system cannot scale to manage the volume of forecasted traffic”

“Internet of Drones”: the future of air traffic control system

You’ve heard of the Internet of Things – the generic name given to all the various networked sensors, machines, devices and even buildings in the world – but most of those “things” stay in one place for the most part. The world is primed for an explosion of autonomous ambulatory devices, which led a team of engineers from the University of Waterloo in Canada to draft a conceptual framework for an “Internet of Drones.” Continue reading ““Internet of Drones”: the future of air traffic control system”